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6 Good tips for job searching September 16, 2009

Posted by John M McKee in "John M McKee", Action Plans, anxiety, business success, career planning, Coaching, Job advice, Personal action plans, succeeding during a recession, Tempur-Pedic, Veracity, Women.
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This week, executive and business coach John M McKee shares 6 solid ideas to consider when looking for a new job.

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“Each day brings with it new opportunity and the chance to move forward.”
As nice as though words are, and as much as many readers would like to believe in them, I know from my clients and contacts that there are a lot of people who, simply, don’t.  For them and anyone else in the job search mode, I suggest you check out ExecuNet online.  They go beyond what many subscription services do and provide real and actionable ideas.

The group at ExecuNet are constantly offering a few tips which are not the typical, “here’s how to get a job” ideas that everyone is publishing all the time now.  I thought this week’s newsletter suggestions were very worth sharing – I’ve copied some of it here:

1. Focus on networking with people you don’t know as quickly as possible. During the first month of a search, contact a minimum of 50 “warm” contacts, those you know and with whom you are comfortable. After the first month, network to at least 100 new contacts every month.

2. Search for interim roles when you begin your search. Up to 40 percent of the time, interim roles lead to full-time positions. When you work on an interim/consulting basis, you and the company become so comfortable with each other that a full-time position is often created.

3. Target smaller companies. Research Dun & Bradstreet, Moody’s Million Dollar Directory, Standard and Poor’s, Hoover’s and other websites for valuable smaller company information. The reference section at public libraries provides access to these resources, sometimes for free.

4. Identify underperforming companies. A significant portion of competition for jobs comes from working executives. During a weak economy, they are less inclined to move to a struggling company which carries greater risk. Therefore, there is less competition for these jobs.

5. Spend less than 10 percent of the time contacting and working with recruiters. Executive job seekers are advised to limit their involvement to those recruiters they have retained in the past or are referred to them by close friends and colleagues. Even recruiters themselves acknowledge the limitations of obtaining an executive position by relying too heavily on search firms, because recruiters only account for about 10 percent of all executive hires.

6. Allocate no more than five percent of your search effort responding to published job leads and Internet postings. Responses should only be made to opportunities which closely match your skills and experience. Thousands of individuals see these opportunities, dramatically increasing competition and reducing the odds of securing the position. Be sure you are a “best fit” for a published/posted opening.

The advice above was adapted from Change Your Job Search Approach in a Recessionary Economy by Tucker Mays and Bob Sloane, which was originally available to ExecuNet members in November, 2008. If you are interested in the entire article, or other expert advice like it, consider an ExecuNet membership.

john

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Comments»

1. internet tips - October 4, 2009

great tips, check mine out http://www.youronlinetipsource.com they are really good


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